so adults aren’t protected venting about their jobs but high school students can vent about their schools? (brandi levy)

we all have a habit of “posting while angry“.
posting while depressed,
horny,
doing crimes,
etc etc etc.
sites like twitter want us to be as honest as possible with our thoughts.
we have seen how some folks have gotten caught up with their past tweets.
 ig stories,
snapchat,
and now “fleets” on twitter help us be unapologetic for 24 hours with disappearing posts.
we have seen how folks will screenshot and repost our shit.
we have seen from different examples of folks who put all their fingers in their mouths.
folks have lost their jobs,
career opportunities,
relationships,
freedom,

and blessings by going a little too hard on the social medias.
brandi levy was a high school student when she went off about her high school cheerleading squad.
she has taken getting caught up to the supreme court

A Pennsylvania teenager whose profanity-laced outburst on social media got her banished from her high school’s cheerleading squad is in the spotlight at the U.S. Supreme Court this week, arguing “I shouldn’t have to be afraid to express myself.”

Brandi Levy, who made her Snapchat post away from school and on a weekend, is at the center of a major case testing the limits of the U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment guarantee of freedom of speech. The nine justices on Wednesday are set to hear arguments in the Mahanoy Area School District’s appeal of a lower court ruling in favor of Levy that found that the First Amendment bars public school officials from regulating off-campus speech.

Levy’s indelicate May 2017 Snapchat post came two days after Mahanoy Area High School, in Pennsylvania’s coal region, held its cheerleading tryouts. The ninth-grader, who had been a junior varsity cheerleader, was still infuriated about being left off the varsity squad.

At a convenience store in Mahanoy City on a Saturday, she posted a picture of her and a friend holding up their middle fingers, adding a caption using the same curse word four times to voice her displeasure with cheerleading, softball, school and “everything.”

She was 14 years old at the time. She is now an 18-year-old college student studying accounting.

I feel like students should be protected and be able to express themselves without getting any form of punishment for it from the school,” Levy said in an interview. “It’ll set an example for everyone that it’s okay for people to express their feelings out of school.

foxhole,
this is really interesting to me.
i feel it will take us down a winding rabbit hole tbh


so it’ll be okay for a high school students to go off about their schools on off hours,
but an adult says “FUCK THIS JOB” after work and it’s the end of the world.
hr will have you in the office trying to re-evaluate your position within the company.
this made me wonder…

Why is it not okay for adults,
but freedom of speech laws will be okay for students?

is it because they aren’t getting paid to attend school?
is it damaging to the company rather than the high school?
why is it okay for high school students to be protected by this law,
but adults have to “be careful” with expressing themselves?
i feel like people pick and choose how they want to accept freedom of speech in this sensitive world.
if you post your dissatisfaction about your job during off-hours,
about someone who hurt your feelings,
or a life that you don’t understand

Is doing it so no one can hear or see it any better?

does that make people more comfortable?
best believe,
just because your job doesn’t think it’s a shit hole,
that doesn’t mean people aren’t talking about it.
that was the issue with my last job.
they didn’t want to know people were talking about how terrible it was rather than making it better.
i tried to make it better and i was banished.
hr’s job isn’t there to protect you; it’s there to protect the company.
you can’t even complain about the work environment because they’ll see you as a threat.
they’ll have this attitude of “we’ll find someone else” but…

The job is still trash!!!!

so it’s bringing a new person into a trash work environment to rinse and repeat.
i’m confused.


i’m curious to read any comments about this.

article cc: reuters

Author: jamari fox

the fox invited to the blogging table.

5 thoughts on “so adults aren’t protected venting about their jobs but high school students can vent about their schools? (brandi levy)

  1. Was this a public school or private school that she was at? Cause private schools can kick you out for any reason that they feel violates the agreement thing that you sign. And I also think that’s why adults lose their jobs over social media posts. They will claim that you violated the terms of your employment contract that says you represent our company so don’t be a dick. Theoretically, if you make an offensive post that leads to a bunch of backlash and people find out that you are associated with that job/org/institution, then it makes it look like “oh they cool with having a racist-homo/xenophobic-misogynistic person working for them” and it’s bad pr for the company. That’s why they be so quick to issue that statement about how your actions “do not reflect the values that our company hold” and all that generic stuff. You’ve basically become more of a liability for the job, especially if someone recognizes you ass the butthole from that one post. Now I’m no lawyer and am pretty sure that most people who do get fired over this have a case to sue. But idk how many jobs actually have that morality clause in their contract.

    1. ^i think it was public and this comment was really good.

      i feel like if the majority of employees venting about a job,
      and the turnover rate is through the roof,
      it’s time for the job to have a touch base on where they are going wrong.

      many jobs talk about there is an open door policy but nothing ever comes from the complaints.

  2. I could be wrong, but I think the First Amendment supposedly only protects public speech, or speech at a government entity. It does not protect speech at private organizations (schools, businesses, etc.). It’s why Twitter and other private platforms can ban people, but if you go out on a public street or park and start expressing your views, the government can’t shut you down, though cops still may using charges of disruptive public behavior.

    So if she was at a public school (or university, etc.), she should be protected. If she was at a private school (non-sectarian, Catholic, etc.) they could expel her if she violated their code of conduct. But who knows how the Supreme Court will rule now that all of you know who’s people are on it.

    1. Yeah, most people don’t even realize that the first word in the first amendment is congress. It’s literally supposed to be there so that the government (not a private company) doesn’t arrest you for expressing your views. But there is something called the spirit of the law, which is what everyone who shouts about their rights is unknowingly referring to. I just know that the whole letter of the law vs spirit thing gets murky but that’s why companies and corporations have terms of service and contracts to cover that they don’t want you to put out certain things while on or representing them or their products.

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